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Business information systems: technology, development and management for the e-business

Business information systems: technology, development and management for the e-business

Bocij, Paul, author; Hickie, Simon, author; Greasley, Andrew, author

Assuming no prior knowledge of IS or IT, this book explains new concepts and terms as simply as possible. The importance of information in developing a company business strategy and assisting decision making is explained in this study volume

Book. English.
Fifth edition
Published Harlow, England: Pearson, 2015
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Details

Edition statement: Paul Bocij, Andrew Greasley and Simon Hickie.
ISBN: 0273736450, 9780273736455
Intended audience: Specialized.
Note: Previous edition: 2008.
Note: Includes bibliographical references and index.
Physical Description: xxix, 673 pages : illustrations (black and white, and colour) ; 27 cm
Subject: Business and Management.; Management information systems.

Contents

  1. Preface
  2. Guided tour
  3. Plan of the book
  4. About the authors
  5. Acknowledgements
  6. Publisher’s acknowledgements
  7. Part 1 INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS INFORMATION SYSTEMS
  8. 1 Basic concepts – understanding information
  9. Links to other chapters
  10. Learning outcomes / Management issues
  11. Introduction
  12. Data and information
  13. Creating information
  14. Qualities of information
  15. Case study 1.1: Technology sponsors a complementary form of capitalism
  16. The business environment
  17. Managerial decision making
  18. Case study 1.2: Dealing with the data deluge
  19. Focus on knowledge management
  20. Summary
  21. Exercises
  22. References / Further reading / Web links
  23. 2 Basic concepts – an introduction to business information systems
  24. Links to other chapters
  25. Learning outcomes / Management issues
  26. Introduction
  27. Introduction to systems
  28. Different types of systems
  29. Business information systems
  30. Resources that support BIS
  31. Categories of business information system
  32. E-business systems
  33. Enterprise systems
  34. BIS and strategic advantage
  35. Case study 2.1: PayPal eyes in-store retail customers
  36. Mini case study: Capital One develops information leadership
  37. Case study 2.2: Corporate IT falling short of potential
  38. Summary
  39. Exercises
  40. References / Further reading / Web links
  41. 3 Hardware and software
  42. Links to other chapters
  43. Learning outcomes / Management issues
  44. Introduction
  45. Components of a computer system
  46. Major categories of computers
  47. Types of microcomputers
  48. Input devices
  49. Case study 3.1: Mainframes are thriving in a cloud world
  50. Mini case study: Optical mark recognition
  51. Case study 3.2: Hertz reaps virtualisation rewards
  52. Case study 3.3: Business life – Rise of the paperless meeting
  53. Case study 3.4: Cloud is silver lining for German online bank Fidor
  54. Output devices
  55. Focus on printers
  56. Storage devices
  57. Processors
  58. Categories of software
  59. Document production software
  60. Graphics packages
  61. Spreadsheets
  62. Management applications of productivity software
  63. Multimedia software
  64. Software for using the Internet
  65. Focus on software distribution models
  66. Summary
  67. Exercises
  68. References / Further reading / Web links
  69. 4 Databases and business intelligence
  70. Links to other chapters
  71. Learning outcomes / Management issues
  72. Introduction
  73. Databases
  74. Business intelligence
  75. Data warehouses
  76. Case study 4.1: Big data put under the spotlight as never before
  77. Case study 4.2: Making business intelligence work
  78. Business analytics
  79. Case study 4.3: After 160 years, the value of maps is starting to be appreciated
  80. Mini case study: How to get rid of ‘devil customers’
  81. Mini case study: Using GIS to identify road traffic accident locations
  82. Mini case study: Traders' tools turn tables on dodgy deals
  83. Summary
  84. Exercises
  85. References / Further reading / Web links
  86. 5 Networks, telecommunications and the Internet
  87. Links to other chapters
  88. Learning outcomes / Management issues
  89. Introduction
  90. Computer networks
  91. Network components
  92. Network types
  93. The Internet
  94. Case study 5.1: Death of a matchmaker
  95. Focus on how the Internet works – Internet standards
  96. Focus on mobile or wireless access devices
  97. Case Study 5.2: Americans turning off TV and on to digital devices
  98. Focus on EDI
  99. Focus on Voice over IP (VOIP)
  100. Case study 5.3: Asian apps challenge Western dominance
  101. Summary
  102. Exercises
  103. References / Further reading / Web links
  104. 6 Enterprise and functional BIS
  105. Links to other chapters
  106. Learning outcomes / Management issues
  107. Introduction
  108. Enterprise systems
  109. Case study 6.1: ERP: A convincing case must be made before investment
  110. Case study 6.2: Managing the supply chain
  111. Mini case study: The supply chains that could bind unsuspecting managers
  112. Operations information systems
  113. Case study 6.3: Retail applications of TPS by Sainsbury’s
  114. Management information systems
  115. Departmental applications
  116. Summary
  117. Exercises
  118. References / Further reading / Web links
  119. Part 2 BUSINESS INFORMATION SYSTEMS DEVELOPMENT
  120. 7 An introduction to acquiring and developing BIS
  121. Links to other chapters
  122. Learning outcomes / Management issues
  123. Introduction
  124. How and why are information systems acquired?
  125. Software acquisition and the systems development lifecycle
  126. Bespoke development
  127. Case study 7.1: Lloyds Bank Insurance Services applies RAD
  128. Case study 7.2: Use of waterfall v. agile methods at Mellon Financial
  129. Purchase of an off-the-shelf package
  130. User development software
  131. Case study 7.3: Lascelles Fine Foods
  132. Summary
  133. Exercises
  134. References / Further reading / Web links
  135. 8 Initiating systems development
  136. Links to other chapters
  137. Learning outcomes / Management issues
  138. Introduction
  139. Reasons for project initiation
  140. The feasibility study
  141. Risk management
  142. Case study 8.1: Recession reveals the dark side of advanced IT
  143. Acquisition choices and methods
  144. Focus on techniques for comparing systems
  145. Mini case study: Feature checklist for comparing three different groupwave products
  146. Case study 8.2: Sedgemoor District Council
  147. Summary
  148. Exercises
  149. References / Further reading / Web links
  150. 9 BIS project management
  151. Links to other chapters
  152. Learning outcomes / Management issues
  153. Introduction
  154. Case study 9.1: Putting an all-inclusive price tag on successful IT
  155. The project management process
  156. Mini case study: The key to ... project planning
  157. Case study 9.2: Project management: Lessons can be learned from successful delivery
  158. Steps in project management
  159. Focus on a project management methodology: PRINCE2
  160. A project management tool: network analysis
  161. Summary
  162. Exercises
  163. References / Further reading / Web links
  164. 10 Systems analysis
  165. Links to other chapters
  166. Learning outcomes / Management issues
  167. Introduction
  168. Identifying the requirements
  169. Focus on requirements determination in a lean or agile environment
  170. Documenting the findings
  171. Case study 10.1: IFD drawing – a student records system
  172. Focus on soft systems methodology
  173. Systems analysis – an evaluation
  174. Software tools for systems analysis
  175. Case study 10.2: ABC case study
  176. Summary
  177. Exercises
  178. References / Further reading / Web links
  179. 11 Systems design
  180. Links to other chapters
  181. Learning outcomes / Management issues
  182. Introduction
  183. Aims of system design
  184. Case study 11.1: Beaverbrooks the Jewellers
  185. Constraints on system design
  186. The relationship between analysis and design
  187. Elements of design
  188. System or outline design
  189. Case study 11.2: Systems management: driving innovation should be the main objective
  190. Detailed design (module design)
  191. Focus on relational database design and normalisation
  192. Design of input and output
  193. User interface design
  194. Focus on web site design for B2C e-commerce
  195. Input design
  196. Output design
  197. Designing interfaces between systems
  198. Defining the structure of program modules
  199. Security design
  200. Design tools: CASE (computer-aided software engineering) tools
  201. Error handling and exceptions
  202. Help and documentation
  203. Focus on: object-oriented design (OOD)
  204. Summary
  205. Exercises
  206. References / Further reading / Web links
  207. 12 System build, implementation and maintenance: change management
  208. Links to other chapters
  209. Learning outcomes / Management issues
  210. Introduction
  211. System build and implementation
  212. Mini case study: Jim Goodnight: crunching the numbers
  213. Maintenance
  214. Change management
  215. Case study 12.1: Applying performance goals to business-process management drives growth and innovation
  216. Case study 12.2: Play pick-and-mix to innovate with SOA
  217. Summary
  218. Exercises
  219. References / Further reading / Web links
  220. Part 3 BUSINESS INFORMATION SYSTEMS MANAGEMENT
  221. 13 Information systems strategy
  222. Links to other chapters
  223. Learning outcomes / Management issues
  224. Introduction
  225. The strategic context
  226. Introduction to BIS strategy
  227. Case Study 13.1: Which cloud model will prevail?
  228. Tools for strategic analysis and definition
  229. IS and business strategy integration
  230. Focus on IS/IT and SMEs
  231. Case Study 13.2: Next generation of clients forces pace of IT change
  232. Summary
  233. Exercises
  234. References / Further reading / Web links
  235. 14 Information systems management
  236. Links to other chapters
  237. Learning outcomes / Management issues
  238. Introduction
  239. Information systems investment appraisal
  240. Determining investment levels for information systems in an organisation
  241. Locating the information systems management function
  242. Outsourcing
  243. Mini case study: Customers admit blame for outsourcing failures
  244. Case study 14.1: Outsourcing: beware false economies
  245. Beyond strategic information systems – the importance of IS capability
  246. Focus on IT infrastructure flexibility
  247. Pulling it all together: IT governance and COBIT
  248. Case study 14.2: IT trends shape future corporate strategies
  249. Summary
  250. Exercises
  251. References / Further reading / Web links
  252. 15 Managing information security
  253. Links to other chapters
  254. Learning outcomes / Management issues
  255. Introduction
  256. The need for controls
  257. Mini case study: Complacent staff weak link in combating cyber criminals
  258. Case study 15.1: Online cybercrime rings forced to home in on smaller prey
  259. Control strategies
  260. Types of controls
  261. Some techniques for controlling information systems
  262. Focus on malware
  263. Case study 15.2: Cybercrime costs US $100bn a year
  264. Threats related to Internet services
  265. Summary
  266. Exercises
  267. References / Further reading / Web links
  268. 16 End-user computing – providing end-user services
  269. Links to other chapters
  270. Learning outcomes / Management issues
  271. Introduction
  272. End-user IS services
  273. Managing network services
  274. Mini case study: Cyberslacking: employees surf non-work-related web sites
  275. End-user computing
  276. The IT help desk
  277. Mini case study: A snapshot of the role of the IT help desk in the modern organisation
  278. Case study 16.1: The 21st-century help desk
  279. End-user development
  280. Managing EUC as part of IS strategy
  281. Case study 16.2: Time to call the help desk?
  282. Summary
  283. Exercises
  284. References / Further reading / Web links
  285. 17 Ethical, legal and moral constraints on information systems
  286. Links to other chapters
  287. Learning outcomes / Management issues
  288. Introduction
  289. Professionalism, ethics and morality
  290. Codes of conduct
  291. Social issues
  292. Case study 17.1: Small mistakes attract the biggest trouble
  293. Legal issues
  294. Case study 17.2: Sony fined after lapses at games network
  295. Focus on software piracy
  296. Mini case study: Pirate Bay hacker jailed for two years
  297. Summary
  298. Exercises
  299. References / Further reading / Web links
  300. Glossary
  301. Index

Author note

Andrew Greasley lectures in Information Systems, Operations Management and Simulation Modelling at Aston Business School, Aston University.

 

 

Paul Bocij is a Senior Teaching Fellow at Aston Business School. An experienced educator, he has worked for a wide variety of institutions, including universities, colleges and numerous commercial organisations. His commercial experience includes time spent in the fields of programming, management, training and consultancy. 

 

 

Simon Hickie has worked for 20 years as a senior lecturer in business information systems, having previously worked for 10 years in the management information systems field in a variety of roles including progammer, project manager and trainer. His particular interests lie in the areas of information systems in SMEs, change management and strategic information systems management.

Description

In order to run a successful business, today’s manager needs to combine business skills with an understanding of information systems and the opportunities and benefits that they bring to an organisation. Starting from basic concepts, this book provides a comprehensive and accessible guide to:

understanding the technology of business information systems;

choosing the right information system for an organisation;

developing and managing an efficient business information system;

employing information systems strategically to achieve organisational goals.

 

Taking a problem-solving approach, Business Information Systems looks at information systems theory within the context of the most recent business and technological advances. This thoroughly revised new edition has updated and expanded coverage of contemporary key topics such as:

Web 2.0

enterprise systems

implementation and design of IS strategy

outsourcing

 

Business Information Systems does not assume any prior knowledge of IS or ICT, and new concepts are simply defined. New business examples, case studies and web links are fully integrated throughout, illustrating the relevance and impact of information systems in today’s business environment. In addition there are a wealth of questions and exercises both in the book and online at www.pearsoned.co.uk/bis enabling students to test their understanding of key topics and issues.

 

This book is ideal for students on any courses related to business information systems or management information systems at undergraduate or postgraduate level.

 

About the authors

Andrew Greasley lectures in Information Systems, Operations Management and Simulation Modelling at Aston Business School, Aston University.

 

Paul Bocij is a Senior Teaching Fellow at Aston Business School. An experienced educator, he has worked for a wide variety of institutions, including universities, colleges and numerous commercial organisations. His commercial experience includes time spent in the fields of programming, management, training and consultancy. 

 

 

Simon Hickie has worked for 20 years as a senior lecturer in business information systems, having previously worked for 10 years in the management information systems field in a variety of roles including progammer, project manager and trainer. His particular interests lie in the areas of information systems in SMEs, change management and strategic information systems management.

Back cover copy

In order to run a successful business, today’s manager needs to combine business skills with an understanding of information systems and the opportunities and benefits that they bring to an organisation. Starting from basic concepts, this book provides a comprehensive and accessible guide to:

understanding the technology of business information systems;

choosing the right information system for an organisation;

developing and managing an efficient business information system;

employing information systems strategically to achieve organisational goals.

 

Taking a problem-solving approach, Business Information Systems looks at information systems theory within the context of the most recent business and technological advances. This thoroughly revised new edition has updated and expanded coverage of contemporary key topics such as:

Web 2.0

enterprise systems

implementation and design of IS strategy

outsourcing

 

Business Information Systems does not assume any prior knowledge of IS or ICT, and new concepts are simply defined. New business examples, case studies and web links are fully integrated throughout, illustrating the relevance and impact of information systems in today’s business environment.

 

This book is ideal for students on any courses related to business information systems or management information systems at undergraduate or postgraduate level.

 

About the authors

Andrew Greasley lectures in Information Systems, Operations Management and Simulation Modelling at Aston Business School, Aston University.

 

Paul Bocij is a Senior Teaching Fellow at Aston Business School. An experienced educator, he has worked for a wide variety of institutions, including universities, colleges and numerous commercial organisations. His commercial experience includes time spent in the fields of programming, management, training and consultancy. 

 

 

Simon Hickie has worked for 20 years as a senior lecturer in business information systems, having previously worked for 10 years in the management information systems field in a variety of roles including progammer, project manager and trainer. His particular interests lie in the areas of information systems in SMEs, change management and strategic information systems management.